Town of Bashaw council baffled by province’s police tax rules

Bashaw Welcome Sign ECA Review/Terri Huxley
Stu Salkeld
Written by Stu Salkeld

Increased costs for policing across Alberta may have been ordered by Edmonton in 2019, but it’s the everyday taxpaying Albertan who will be ponying up for them. 

How they will go about paying those costs, though, has become a bit of a mystery.

Case in point: the Town of Bashaw regular council meeting Feb. 4, where Chief Administrative Officer (CAO) Theresa Fuller brought back to council a report on how the municipality can collect the province’s new policing tax revenue. 

The provincial government announced late in 2019 that it was boosting police service across Alberta and that local taxpayers would foot the bill.

At their last regular council meeting Bashaw councillors rescinded their previous attempt to pass on the costs through a utility fee. 

At that meeting, Fuller stated the provincial government prohibits municipalities collecting police funds through utilities fees. 

Councillors asked Fuller to investigate other avenues.

She returned with a report that stated it appears there are few options.

“Inquired from villages in Camrose County, Clive and Alix,” stated Fuller’s report. “Many of them are including it as an expense within their operating budget. 

“Several of the villages are using their Municipal Sustainability Initiative Operating grant to pay for it.

“Proceeding this way ensures there is not a tax increase, however, operational costs are then supported by a grant; not a sustainable way to manage it.

“The Town of Bashaw is undergoing a Municipal Accountability Program review in April. 

If we choose to proceed in the same manner as the county, include it as a requisition, it will be reflected against us in our review.

“The municipal advisor assisting with our review has informed us the only recommended method is to include it in operational costs as an expense. 

“In the event that we proceed with a requisition, it could present a liability.”

Fuller noted the general public may see it as the local council increasing taxes. “It is unfortunate that it presents an inaccurate picture of increased taxes,” she stated.

Coun. Lynn Schultz stated he was frustrated that it seems the province is worried about taking the blame for increasing taxes. 

“I guess there’s nothing we can do about it,” said Schultz.

Coun. Darren Pearson suggested tax bills, for example, should have a note explaining the tax hike came from the provincial government. 

“As long as the people know why the taxes are going up,” said Pearson.

Pearson then suggested increasing tax rates on provincial government property in Bashaw, to which he received some laughter from fellow councillors.

The conversation closed by Fuller noting Bashaw taxpayers would be paying $23,000 more this year for policing.

 

Stu Salkeld, Local Journalism Initiative reporter

ECA Review

About the author

Stu Salkeld

Stu Salkeld

Stu Salkeld, who has upwards of 28 years of experience in the Alberta community newspaper industry, is now covering councils and other news in the Stettler region and has experience working in the area as well.

He has joined the ECA Review as a Local Journalism Initiative Journalist.

Stu earned his two-year diploma in print journalism from SAIT in Calgary from 1993 to ’95 and was raised in Oyen, Alta., one of the communities within the ECA Review’s coverage area.