Student film series highlights fracking issues

Mentors Rajan Rathnavalu and Dittmar Mundel pose with Alison Bortolon and Hans Asfeldt, creators of the fracking documentaries.

Mentors Rajan Rathnavalu and Dittmar Mundel pose with Alison Bortolon and Hans Asfeldt, creators of the fracking documentaries.

After a summer of investigative videography, University of Alberta students Hans Asfeldt and Alison Bortolon are releasing a multi-part series of short films on the subject of fracking in Alberta. Through the AlbertaVoices project, the duo focused on the often-contested, polarizing subject of hydraulic fracturing – the rupture of rock using pressurized liquid often mixed with sand and chemicals.

As a primary part of the series, Asfeldt and Bortolon sought out Alberta landowners – including farmers, retirees and operators – to gather perspectives of individuals affected by hydraulic fracturing practices across the Province and how their accounts often differ from the rhetoric of industry and government.

Alison Bortolon says the intent of the films were to help create a dialogue between industry and landowners, and also to give voice to people who may not otherwise have a forum to speak to their experience. “I saw the value in being able to share a human experience,” Bortolon says, “You can’t shut down people’s experiences; people’s stories.”

Bortolon says the medium of film seemed the perfect forum to represent a myriad of perspectives. “[Films] are fun to make but they’re also interactive; people enjoy watching them,” she says.

As a takeaway from the film series, Bortolon says she hopes people are more aware of the issues going on within Alberta.

Alberta Voices website – albertavoices.com – will release a new movie from the series every Tuesday, for the next six weeks. This will accompany the myriad of videos already present on the site.

About the author

Avatar

ECA Review Publisher

Subscribe

* indicates required