Ruling on Paradise Shores Development greatly reduces allowed density

The Subdivision Development Appeal Board (SDAB) has reduced the density for Paradise Shores Development Permit 18001 from the originally approved 370 RV Units and/or Campground sites in Phase 1, to a maximum of 168 sites for the entire development on NE 20-40-20 W4M (the area described as Phase 1 and Phase 2 in the Area Structure Plan).

The SDAB heard eight appeals filed by appellants opposed to different aspects of the originally approved Paradise Shores Development Permit 18001, and one appeal filed by the Applicant in a preliminary hearing held on August 16, 2018, and in the merit hearing held on September 18 and 19, 2018.

All of the appeals were ‘allowed in part’ in the ruling.

Some of the highlights from the SDAB decision include Density reduction from 370 Recreational Vehicle stalls in Phase 1 to a maximum of 168 Recreational Vehicle stalls and/or Campground sites across the whole quarter section NE 20-40-20 W4M.

New studies and plans are required, including an updated Traffic Impact Assessment (TIA), geotechnical assessment of slopes, landscaping plan, and site plans.

Amenities and the Recreational Facility – Outdoor Use must be completed within one year from the date of the approved site plan.

The applicant is required to pay for construction of the surface of a 38 stall truck/trailer combination parking lot proximate to the White Sands boat launch.

The Applicant must enter into a development agreement with the County of Stettler to construct roads required by the updated TIA, construct infrastructure required to provide access to the development and construct a parking lot for the White Sands boat launch.

The SDAB agreed with the Appellants that the density of the proposed development was not consistent with the applicable density policies of the applicable Intermunicipal Development Plans and determined the proposed Development is subject to the density provisions for lands within the ‘Small Lot Area’ at 1.97 dwelling units per acre prescribed in the Buffalo Lake South Shore Intermunicipal Development Plan.

A complete copy of the decision is available on our website at www.stettlercounty.ca.

Stettler County Reeve Larry Clarke said, “We trust the process this decision has been made through, and we respect and support the ruling made by the Subdivision Development and Appeal Board. I believe the Board carried out its statutory duty.”

Yvette Cassidy, Chief Administrative Officer (CAO) for the County of Stettler said, “We will now work through the process outlined by the SDAB, and we will work with the developer on meeting the conditions set out in this decision.”

Subdivision and Development Appeal Boards are established by municipal councils under Part 17 of the Municipal Government Act (MGA) to hear appeals from decisions made by the municipality’s subdivision and development authorities.

SDAB decisions shape a community and affect the lives of residents, neighbours, businesses and developers.

By hearing appeals and making decisions, an SDAB fulfils a vital function in achieving the goal of orderly, beneficial and economic development and use of land set out in the MGA.

An SDAB enhances local and regional land use, planning and development by providing the opportunity for an independent review of planning and development decisions.

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