‘Compassionate Earth Walk’ kicks off

Shodo Spring

Shodo Spring

Four visible police vehicles heavily monitored the highway around the Hardisty tank farm on July 8 when three women began trekking southbound from the tank farm, led by retired social worker, author and Zen Buddhist Priest Shodo Spring.
This is the beginning of a long journey for Shodo, a 65 year old grandmother of four.
Shodo intends to roughly follow the 2000 kilometre route of the proposed Keystone XL pipeline to Steele City, Nevada. Shodo calls her journey the “Compassionate Earth Walk” and is joined by people from a diverse variety of backgrounds– education, journalism, engineering and priesthood, to name a few. Her interfaith and intercultural group currently has six members but it grows and shrinks depending on how much time each individual has commited to walk with Shodo.
When asked why she started the walk, she said she was inspired by her grandchildren.
“What could possibly be done to save the world for them,” said Shodo. “People should be able to have a good life and also take care of the planet for their grandchildren.”
This walk is not an anti-oil protest but rather a call for sustainability in all industries on behalf of the future generations.
Laura Whitney, president of the non-profit Ojai Foundation and educated in film and anthropology, is one of Shodo’s companions.
“We are dedicated to deep listening to the people and the environment along the trail and asking questions for the future generation,” said Whitney.
A possible documentary on the “Compassionate Earth Walk” is in the making. Members also plan to host public events along their journey.
Visit their Facebook page at facebook.com/CompassionateEarth for more information.

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